Coming to Be Rescued

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There was this Japanese saying I was exposed to when I was a kid that stuck with me, “The glory is not in never falling but rising after each time that you fall.”  I still like that because as an adult, I fall or fail still but in different ways.

Matthew 14:25-31.

25 Shortly before dawn Jesus went out to them, walking on the lake. 26 When the disciples saw him walking on the lake, they were terrified. “It’s a ghost,” they said, and cried out in fear.

27 But Jesus immediately said to them: “Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.”

28 “Lord, if it’s you,” Peter replied, “tell me to come to you on the water.”

29 “Come,” he said.

Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came toward Jesus. 30 But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, “Lord, save me!”

31 Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “You of little faith,” he said, “why did you doubt?”

32 And when they climbed into the boat, the wind died down. 33 Then those who were in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God.”

Imagine the men in the boat seeing this supposed phantom in the water.  They cry out of fear since they think that if the laws of nature are being broken, nothing could be good about that.  Maybe they even think that Jesus had died in the short time that He had gone away for some alone time.

The Bible says “fear not”  365 times (not a coincidence for those of us that need to remind ourselves every day).  But this is one of the few times that  the Lord qualifies this with his incarnational presence.  We need that.  We need to remind ourselves that the mystery of the ages known as God has been made touchable on earth.  That peace and goodwill to men is there because of God taking on flesh.  He has put his skin in the game.

At first glance, I see the next part as putting God to the test; which we are not to do.  Jesus was asked in Matthew 12 by the religious men of His day to give him a sign.  He responded strongly and mysteriously: you wicked and adulterous generation (the sign they want would be the instant gratification of a Star Wars movie) and only the cross will be shown to them.

But the test is not from Simon Peter for God but asking for God to test him.  Why else would he not say, “Tell me to jump up and down on the boat?” or “Tell me my brother’s name.” Peter knew enough about the thought and intention of Jesus was for his followers to take their faith out for a spin regularly.  That is the staple of Jesus and one Peter wanted to do anyway.  We know he had that gusto because at the Last Supper he leads the way in saying he would die for Jesus.

The next part is where at least many Protestants laugh at Peter’s expense to easily.  Jesus says come, he has flaky thinking and is humbled to ask Jesus for a rescue.  But in all my bible studies or sermons where this is touched on with comedy relief we forget that he had faith to begin with.  Jesus could have said “You of little awesome belief.”  Peter was not hurt but maybe encouraged.  It is like a statement that he has some of the quality that is needed and is yet to be grown.  It is an encouraging and teachable moment.

After that exchange the others proclaim Jesus is the Son of God.  That is good but I do not envy them like I do Peter.  It is easy to be an impressed spectator but another thing to fall before Jesus while going towards him.  Lesson: risk falling in your faith.  And if you must fall, fall towards Jesus. You may not become pope, but at least you will be at a better place to be teachable.

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Carl Rodgers at Work

Years ago I was in a semi-accredited bible college in Aloha, Oregon when I heard some historical insights about Jesus that have stuck with me for years and in this past year have taken on a new context.

In a class that covered theology of who Jesus is called Christology, I heard about Plato foretelling Jesus without knowing it. The instructor said that Plato saw three realms that are parts of all of existence. The first realm was in our present world that we can see in touch; which is easy to comprehend.

The second is in this small, bitty realm that is too small to see. Those small things that are considered in their own realm but make up our matter were called atomes. Scientists can say, “Thanks, Plato!”

The third realm could be called heaven by modern Western culture. It is a pure realm that is above corruption like our world. And in that world exists a god. No, Plato was no Jew or any other monotheist that we would recognize by tradition (for more about that idea among Greeks, look at Acts 17).

But Plato did not stop there. He theorized that there could be away for this god to bring in the incorruptible to the corruptible. But if he were to do that, he would have to provide input of his very essence. The word he chose to use for this essence in the theory was logos. By the end of this lecture I imagined Plato being whisked away in a Delorean for time travel for four hundred years in the future to convert to Christianity. Below is why.

John 1: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God…. 14 And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth.

The reason why this is connected is that the word for “Word” was logos. Jesus was before Abraham and was one with the Father (John 10:31). He was from the outside and came into the world to bring incorruption to this world of decay.

But things have become more relevant to me this past year.

Last summer I was learning different therapeutic modalities in my Masters in Social Work program at Arizona State University. There was a man named Carl Rodgers in a film with a client named Gloria. His therapy was called Client-Centered Therapy.

His rules for the road were to stay in the present, develop an authentic relationship with the client and by being in that bubble with them create a blank slate by which the client can redefine themself.

This is almost Christianity! It’s personal, practical and relational. Seeing the beauty in what Rodgers did with a woman with profound pain and insecurity inspired me as a future social worker to carry that authenticity that goes beyond being a reflective listener. An example is Rodgers saying to Gloria when she grieved for rejection by her father, “I think you would make a great daughter.”

But before the reader gets hit with goose bumps, remember that I said “Almost Christianity.”

First, you can’t have Christianity without Jesus Christ. He is the center as the anti-decay to the world of decay.

Second, I have to use a four-letter word: Lord. He desperately loves us but to receive Him, even if we have a foggy past with religion that lacked love, we must come to a fundamental surrender that He is Lord. If a healthy parent does things right, they know not to be their kids’ “friend”. But they can still get down on their knees and play Legos. They can be a logos of sorts with the legos. It is a tension that can be brought in with wisdom from above.

For a picture of this wisdom that comes from above, I will leave the reader with this to consider and look for in any of the relationships in their life.

James 3:17 But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits, without a trace of partiality or hypocrisy.

Mercy and Judgment. Both/and?

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Both/and can seem like a cop out. In human nature our draw toward security makes us oversimplify life into either/or, black or white paradigms.  Paradox is not the friend of someone that does not want to get out of the oversimplifying bubble. 

Such is the problem one could have when reading about Annanias and Saphira if you want to see God only as giving mankind teachable moments.  For those of you not familiar with the story, Annanias and Saphira came into the early church with their communal living.  By living communally, they could be counting on communal support to the highest level.  In keeping up the 100% dedication appearance, they said they were giving all of the proceeds of their land but they did not really.  Peter got a line on this through the Holy Spirit and both spouses dropped dead the same day. 

Acts 5: 3 “Ananias,” Peter asked, “why has Satan filled your heart to lie to the Holy Spirit and to keep back part of the proceeds of the land?…11 And great fear seized the whole church and all who heard of these things.”

But it does not end there with fear.  The story goes on to show really good things. 

“12 Now many signs and wonders were done among the people through the apostles. And they were all together in Solomon’s Portico. 13 None of the rest dared to join them, but the people held them in high esteem. 14 Yet more than ever believers were added to the Lord, great numbers of both men and women, 15 so that they even carried out the sick into the streets, and laid them on cots and mats, in order that Peter’s shadow might fall on some of them as he came by. 16 A great number of people would also gather from the towns around Jerusalem, bringing the sick and those tormented by unclean spirits, and they were all cured.”

Are the two streams, one of wrath and one of grace, a contradiction?  I think they would have to be without the role of holiness.  In Peter’s epistle that he wrote decades later, he says that the Church is a holy nation.  In the Acts passage, Peter does not make the lying an offense to him personally but all to and about God.  The church is holy not by personality or hierarchy but by the infused work of the Holy Spirit on the individual and the group.  A natural nation you may feel entitled under carnal rules to try to scam and work around, but for a holy nation you do not.  A holy nation always would have a north star to keep their bearings in, and the living work of the Holy Spirit by the intercession of Jesus perpetuates the deposit of truth and holiness in ways we like and ways we don’t. 

But where does this leave Peter?  Throughout the scriptures we know two things: he was very good at being flaky and he was also called as the chief of the apostles. So how could those factors help Peter when he is delivering news of God judgment and of His healing?  Jesus said that for those who have been forgiven much will love much.  I can hope that Peter was grieved that his brother and sister in the faith suffered such a consequence, but knew that the mission had to be fulfilled of this holy nation reaching out to very unholy world.  And the people that were of the Church and from outside saw a dynamic going on of consistency of discipline.  This created the right environment for holiness to be shown in the “fun” context of miracles. 

The environment that is touched by this sense of sacredness, or holiness, speaks to all the persons in this story that it is really not about them.  The married couple thought that the Church could be a business, and Peter could have been tempted to see the Church as his own cult of personality.  This holiness calls us beyond the head scratcher paradox directs us to look beyond ones self at God’s larger agenda.  A verse that comes to mind for me that influences me to become a Catholic was, “Thy kingdom comes, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”  That kingdom on earth is to be “one, holy, Catholic and apostolic Church”.  These characteristics are intertwined always.  If we pray and live humbly with that impulse, we will avoid sin and be instruments of Jesus’ grace beyond our wildest dreams. 

Hebrews 4: 12 “Indeed, the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing until it divides soul from spirit, joints from marrow; it is able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart. 13 And before him no creature is hidden, but all are naked and laid bare to the eyes of the one to whom we must render an account.”

 

Consumed With Grace

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It is a nice thought to be bold towards others when it is only in thought, but quite another to be bold with those who are not loving towards us.  But if we rise to such occasion, we are then a light in the world as we walk in the light.

Such is the occasion that I want to cover in this blog entry but often in others as well.  Two blogs ago, we see Peter and John deal with a marginalized, disable person with equality, grace and being practical with his physical need.  This was great.  Last blog, we see Peter talking straight to the crowd that a few years ago were likely okay with the crucifixion of Jesus.  Peter is gracious to a large group as well and treats them with a perspective of them not knowing what they did and there is room for God’ forgiveness.  God is the God of second chances.  These are two degrees of being a light.

For those of us who are Catholics, there has been a lot of talk about the New Evangelization.  I have not read too much of the related encyclicals, but I suspect much of it is a renewal of the fervor we see in the “Old Evangelization” we see here.  I can also see where Pope Francis is onto the same principles described below.  And now, without further ado, here is a third degree of dedication in this cause to a third degree.

While Peter and John were speaking to the people, the priests, the captain of the temple, and the Sadducees came to them, much annoyed because they were teaching the people and proclaiming that in Jesus there is the resurrection of the dead. So they arrested them and put them in custody until the next day, for it was already evening…The next day their rulers, elders, and scribes assembled in Jerusalem, with Annas the high priest, Caiaphas, John,and Alexander, and all who were of the high-priestly family. When they had made the prisoners stand in their midst, they inquired, “By what power or by what name did you do this?” Then Peter, filled with the Holy Spirit, said to them, “Rulers of the people and elders, if we are questioned today because of a good deed done to someone who was sick and are asked how this man has been healed, 10 let it be known to all of you, and to all the people of Israel, that this man is standing before you in good health by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead. 11 This Jesus is the stone that was rejected by you, the builders;
it has become the cornerstone.’12 There is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among mortals by which we must be saved.”

Then Peter, filled with the Holy Spirit, said to them

This is important.  Peter had been filled with the Holy Spirit through a decision to follow the word of Jesus (see Acts 2).  Peter had a level of dependence on God for the right words that started with His indwelling.

by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead.

Peter had a message of Jesus in the context of the cross and the resurrection.  What I have heard from Dr. Scott Hahn, and makes increasing sense to a new Catholic like myself, is that preaching Christ crucified is preaching a gospel that is Eucharistic in nature.  That is that He can be received in Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity in communion because of that ultimate act of self-giving of Jesus on the cross.

13 Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John and realized that they were uneducated and ordinary men, they were amazed and recognized them as companions of Jesus. 14 When they saw the man who had been cured standing beside them, they had nothing to say in opposition. 15 So they ordered them to leave the council while they discussed the matter with one another. 16 They said, “What will we do with them? For it is obvious to all who live in Jerusalem that a notable sign has been done through them; we cannot deny it. ….19 But Peter and John answered them, “Whether it is right in God’s sight to listen to you rather than to God, you must judge; 20 for we cannot keep from speaking about what we have seen and heard.” 21 After threatening them again, they let them go, finding no way to punish them because of the people, for all of them praised God for what had happened. 22 For the man on whom this sign of healing had been performed was more than forty years old.

Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John…

When is the last time we were bold about anything?  Our favorite soda? Movie?  Politician?  Or what about trying to have an expert opinion?  And what is “expertise”?

In this context, boldness is a very pregnant word.  They were noted in their boldness from healing the beggar, to preaching the grace of Jesus to the crowd.

…and realized that they were uneducated and ordinary men, they… recognized them as companions of Jesus.

Those characteristics included being relational to the marginalized and speaking truth to the multitudes.  They were imitating the nature of Jesus in being comfortable in their own skin with anyone and everyone.

The last element from the story is unpleasant but relevant for anyone that wants to carry the sufferings of Jesus fully to the world: being willing to go to the death for testimony of Jesus.

Whether it is right in God’s sight to listen to you rather than to God, you must judge; for we cannot keep from speaking about what we have seen and heard.

Peter was one half of the duo laying their lives down for Jesus.  He does this, as seen above, “filled with the Holy Spirit”.  Without that encounter, Peter lacked the courage to not deny Jesus to a servant girl.  But with that encounter a few years later there is a great difference.  For Peter and John, they had walked with Jesus but continued in Him by teaching according to His revelation, fellowship, communion and prayer (Acts 2:42).  We know Jesus is the same yesterday, today and forever.  So what is stopping us? It is for us to let God re-evangelize us from our complacency in the context of repentance and being filled of Him.  Then we can live and proclaim truth relationally and boldly.

“Power Yield, Team”

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“Power yield, team.”  That was a reminder message I put on my cell several years ago for work.  It was set to go off to keep my head in the right perspective. 

The work at the time was as a Recovery Specialist at Telecare Recovery Center.  It was a post-acute, locked facility for court committed mentally ill.  I had the higher ground in a power differential with the clients since I had a key to get out and historically had a grip on reality more than they had. 

Conflicts sometimes happened and sometimes I would find myself arguing with unreasonable requests in a way that did not always respect the dignity of the person, unlike what was covered in the last post.  This brought some tough talk from co-workers and management. But it also bore fruit and I became a better advocate for it.  

Where we last left off there was a healing of a crippled man in the temple through these country-boys of northern Palestine that were visiting.  The healed man made a spectacle of himself, and who could blame him? 

“Acts 3:11 While he clung to Peter and John, all the people ran together to them in the portico called Solomon’s Portico, utterly astonished. 12 When Peter saw it, he addressed the people, “You Israelites, why do you wonder at this, or why do you stare at us, as though by our own power or piety we had made him walk? 13 The God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, the God of our ancestors has glorified his servant Jesus, whom you handed over and rejected in the presence of Pilate, though he had decided to release him.”

Peter is starting off with the same premise that John the Baptist had: Jesus must increase and I must decrease.  Peter makes his public address to the crowd that this was not about him very clearly.  Peter was very conscious that this was not to be the “Peter Show”.

But that is not to say that there was not an underlying conflict between two mentalities.  One is of love and the other is fear.  The same John that is in this scene said much later, “Perfect love casts out fear.”

“14 But you rejected the Holy and Righteous One and asked to have a murderer given to you, 15 and you killed the Author of life, whom God raised from the dead. To this we are witnesses. 16 And by faith in his name, his name itself has made this man strong, whom you see and know; and the faith that is through Jesus has given him this perfect health in the presence of all of you.”

In these verses, there is a confrontation in speaking truth to power (the social worker in me loves that), but it is still paired with yielding the “blame game” high ground. 

 

17 “And now, friends, I know that you acted in ignorance, as did also your rulers. 18 In this way God fulfilled what he had foretold through all the prophets, that his Messiah would suffer. 19 Repent therefore, and turn to God so that your sins may be wiped out, 20 so that times of refreshing may come from the presence of the Lord, and that he may send the Messiah appointed for you, that is, Jesus.”

 

Now this gets really loaded. 

 

And now, friends, I know that you acted in ignorance, as did also your rulers.

 

This is reminiscent of Jesus and later Stephen saying of the executioners, “Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.”  Peter was a man that had lifted the sword before for Jesus (not Jesus’ idea) and cut a guy’s ear off.  Peter has come a long way in this message of love known as the gospel. 

 

Repent therefore, and turn to God so that your sins may be wiped out

 

We all need a turning point if we want to truly be people that walk in love and truth.  Peter had had his and would have more in years to come.  He really wanted them to experience their own clean slate even among those who were in on the crucifixion. 

 

 so that times of refreshing may come from the presence of the Lord

 

He was inviting them to Jesus, yes, but also into their community. “Come on in, the water is warm.”  This is not too far fetched, because Jesus said, “When two or three are gathered in my name, there am I in their midst.” Otherwise, the call of Jesus is for you and your closet only.  That gets toxic fast because, last I checked, I am a sinner.  Even Peter’s successor 265 popes later said recently the same thing about himself.  To be in the presence of the Lord is to experience Him in community.  The “personal Lord and Savior” thing is rhetoric from very American representations of Christianity.   In other words, whether Peter is talking to the beggar or the crowd, “To join Jesus is to join us.” 

 

So as for the Christ follower, what does this mean for us when we engage people in an unbelieving society?

 

God is in control, and we are not meant to do power trips. “Power yield.” 

 

Forgive.  Just do it.  Acknowledge the weaknesses in those that hurt you and do not emphasize their faults.

 

Be relational with a sincere heart.  Even my clients that were mentally ill (maybe especially so) could see when I was insincere.  Be real as a servant and not as one struggling for notoriety.  See yourself as called to be servant. 

 

And for those of you that read this who are not calling themselves active Christ followers, I can only say I am sorry for the times we in the Christian community have not walked the walk.  I pray that changes and that you consider testing to see if the water could yet be warm.   

Sundays With Simon Peter–A Hand Up

 

 

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“Perfect love drives out dear”.  With what I am about to share combined with the recent death of Nelson Mandela, I hope to speak to two systems that are available to us in some way or another and the stark contrast they have for us who are the givers or receivers in their mindsets. 

 

In Roman times if there was a recent conquest of territory then there would be a herald who would come into town and announce the new way of doing things with not the least of them being that you have to pay taxes.  The power differential was huge for the hearer because of the fear that the herald and his crew represented.  The new way of life is coming, it is Roman, and if you mess with them they have a cross picked out for you. 

 

For the herald and his crew there were two things going for them: the evangelion and Civis Romansus.  The evangelion was the imposing agenda of the empire, or the overarching new empirical truth.  Civis Romanus was the calling card to not be messed with by “the local rabble” as an individual.  There was a commonly told story that if a Roman citizen was surrounded by bandits he could just say “Civis Romanus!” and they would back off.  That was how intimidating the empire was.  

 

But in a backwater, conquered territory there came a carpenter from Palestine.  An itinerant teacher of the Jewish Law who was crucified and some say rose from the dead.  A few years after that a few ex-fishermen become heralds of this new evangelion.  But they did not come to intimidate.  They were there to serve, to love, to heal. 

 

Acts 3:1 One day Peter and John were going up to the temple at the hour of prayer, at three o’clock in the afternoon. And a man lame from birth was being carried in. People would lay him daily at the gate of the temple called the Beautiful Gate so that he could ask for alms from those entering the temple. When he saw Peter and John about to go into the temple, he asked them for alms. Peter looked intently at him, as did John, and said, “Look at us.” And he fixed his attention on them, expecting to receive something from them. But Peter said, “I have no silver or gold, but what I have I give you; in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth,[a] stand up and walk.” And he took him by the right hand and raised him up; and immediately his feet and ankles were made strong. Jumping up, he stood and began to walk, and he entered the temple with them, walking and leaping and praising God. All the people saw him walking and praising God, 10 and they recognized him as the one who used to sit and ask for alms at the Beautiful Gate of the temple; and they were filled with wonder and amazement at what had happened to him.

 

There are several things to glean from this powerful story. 

 

Peter looked intently at him, as did John, and said, “Look at us.”

 

Beggars in that day would not be encouraged to look up in a way that would be consistent with equality.  After all, they or their parents sinned to be in that position.  But instead of affirming to the man defeat, Peter and John affirmed dignity. 

 

But Peter said, “I have no silver or gold, but what I have I give you; in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth,stand up and walk.”

 

Peter had gone through a lot of fire in his life.  He knew what he was, and he knew what he was not.  But most importantly, Peter knew who Jesus was and what He could do.  After dignifying the lame man, he empowered him with the same power of Jesus that he had received. 

 

And he took him by the right hand and raised him up

 

Peter in his interaction has progressed very quickly in this interaction from giving the man dignity, empowerment and relationship.  I say relationship because to clasp hands like this implies symbolically or literally that this marginalized man has a place for dinner that night at a table.  In a letter of Paul, he refers to meeting Peter, James and John with the extension of the “right hand of fellowship”. 

 

So what do dignity, empowerment and relationship combine into?  Salvation.  I say this because Jesus was out to make sure people received salvation as a holistic experience.  The word for saved is sozo, which means whole.  “Call on the Lord and you will be saved.” Is said a lot.  But when the woman was healed by touching the hem of Jesus’ garment, she was also sozo.  Peter understood that he needed to give a holistic experience to than man because this was the nature of Jesus.  As Paul would later write, “the gospel is the power of God unto salvation.”  From Greek: evangelion, dunamis, sozo.  That is to say that the good news of Jesus is the dynamite effect to wholeness to anyone who believes. 

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Years ago I was in a semi-accredited bible college in Aloha, Oregon when I heard some historical insights about Jesus that have stuck with me for years and in this past year have taken on a new context. 

 

In a class that covered theology of who Jesus is called Christology, I heard about Plato foretelling Jesus without knowing it.  The instructor said that Plato saw three realms that are parts of all of existence. The first realm was in our present world that we can see in touch; which is easy to comprehend.

 

The second is in this small, bitty realm that is too small to see.  Those small things that are considered in their own realm but make up our matter were called atomes.  Scientists can say, “Thanks, Plato!”

 

The third realm could be called heaven by modern Western culture.  It is a pure realm that is above corruption like our world.  And in that world exists a god.  No, Plato was no Jew or any other monotheist that we would recognize by tradition (for more about that idea among Greeks, look at Acts 17). 

 

But Plato did not stop there.  He theorized that there could be away for this god to bring in the incorruptible to the corruptible.  But if he were to do that, he would have to provide input of his very essence.  The word he chose to use for this essence in the theory was logos.  By the end of this lecture I imagined Plato being whisked away in a Delorean for time travel for four hundred years in the future to convert to Christianity.  Below is why. 

 

John 1: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God…. 14 And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth.

 

The reason why this is connected is that the word for “Word” was logos.  Jesus was before Abraham and was one with the Father (John 10:31).  He was from the outside and came into the world to bring incorruption to this world of decay. 

 

But things have become more relevant to me this past year. 

 

Last summer I was learning different therapeutic modalities in my Masters in Social Work program at Arizona State University.  There was a man named Carl Rodgers in a film with a client named Gloria.  His therapy was called Client-Centered Therapy.

 

His rules for the road were to stay in the present, develop an authentic relationship with the client and by being in that bubble with them create a blank slate by which the client can redefine themself. 

 

This is almost Christianity! It’s personal, practical and relational.  Seeing the beauty in what Rodgers did with a woman with profound pain and insecurity inspired me as a future social worker to carry that authenticity that goes beyond being a reflective listener.  An example is Rodgers saying to Gloria when she grieved for rejection by her father, “I think you would make a great daughter.” 

 

But before the reader gets hit with goose bumps, remember that I said “Almost Christianity.”

 

First, you can’t have Christianity without Jesus Christ.  He is the center as the anti-decay to the world of decay. 

 

Second, I have to use a four-letter word: Lord.  He desperately loves us but to receive Him, even if we have a foggy past with religion that lacked love, we must come to a fundamental surrender that He is Lord.  If a healthy parent does things right, they know not to be their kids’ “friend”.  But they can still get down on their knees and play Legos.  They can be a logos of sorts with the legos.  It is a tension that can be brought in with wisdom from above. 

 

For a picture of this wisdom that comes from above, I will leave the reader with this. 

 

James 3:17 But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits, without a trace of partiality or hypocrisy.

Here is a link to Rodgers introducing his method.